The introduction of steel foundry products (part 1)

In accordance with the decision taken by the Governing Body of the ILO at its 288 session in November 2003, held a Meeting of Experts on Safety and Health in the Iron and Steel Industry in Geneva from February 1 to 9 of 2005 to draw up and adopt a revised code of practice on safety and health in the iron and steel industry. The meeting was composed of seven experts appointed after consultation with Governments, eight experts appointed after consultation with ‘group and eight experts appointed after consultation with the Workers’ group of the Governing Body of Employers. Adopt original code of practice on safety and health in the iron and steel industry at a meeting of experts in 1981.

This new code, which reflects the many changes in the industry, its workforce, the roles of the competent authorities, employers, workers and their organizations, and the development of new ILO instruments on occupational safety and health focuses on the iron and steel and iron and steel basic products, such as rolled and coated steel, including from recycled content. It does not deal with the mining of raw materials for iron and steel production, which is covered by the Safety and Health in Mines Convention, 1995 (No. 176), and codes of practice on safety and health in coal mines (1986) and safety and health in surface mines (1991), nor does it deal with the fabrication of commercial steel products. The code of conduct is based on principles established in international instruments relevant to the protection of workers’ safety and health.

The first two chapters deal with the objectives and implementation of the code. The next two chapters address, within a national framework, the responsibilities, duties and rights of the competent authority, the labor inspectorate, employers, workers and their organizations, suppliers, manufacturers and designers, and contractors, and occupational safety and health (OSH ) management systems and services and OSH reporting. Part II of the code addresses different operations commonly used in the production of iron and steel – from coke ovens to steel furnaces and foundries, to rolling mills, coating lines and recycling. It also covers transport, competence and training, personal protective equipment, emergency preparedness, and special protection issues and hygiene. Each section describes hazards, risk assessment and provides guidance on eliminating or controlling risk.

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